Books, and a Picture

So I wrote a book. Or rather, I wrote half a book. My good friend Bromleigh McCleneghan wrote the other half, and I should stop right here and say that I wouldn’t have written anything at all if Bromleigh hadn’t called me nearly four years ago and suggested I apply for a week-long writing workshop with her. And I wouldn’t have written this particular book if she hadn’t suggested it. And it wouldn’t have been published if she hadn’t gotten us connected us with the publisher.

But she did, thank goodness, and so I wrote half a book. It’s about… well, it’s about our kids. And parenting. And God. There’s a few references to Paul Tillich and John Wesley and the prophet Isaiah. There’s some Quaker theology, and Shel Silverstein, and Tina Fey, and Desmond Tutu, and an episode from the Family Guy. We had great fun writing it. We hope that you will have great fun reading it.

It’s called Hopes and Fears: Everyday Theology for New Parents and Other Tired, Anxious Peopleand it’s out in the world now, ready to download in whatever electronic format you prefer, and available to order from the Alban Institute or Amazon (the Kindle link is ready now; the print link will be up soon). You can read more about it here, including some very nice reviews. If you’re so inclined, you can also “like” the book on facebook, where we’ll be posting occasional updates.

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Speaking of books, here are two others that are really quite wonderful, especially if you are interested in questions of family, faith, and living life in the world:

I’ve mentioned Katherine Willis Pershey‘s book Any Day a Beautiful Change before, but really, I can’t recommend it highly enough. It’s the story of her family during the difficult and beautiful first year of parenthood. It’s lovely and sweet and real. Please do read it.

MaryAnn McKibben Dana’s book Sabbath in the Suburbs was just released last month. In it, she writes about practicing Sabbath with her husband and three kids in the middle of two careers, school projects, swim practices and the day-in-day-out rush of ordinary life. It’s inspiring, important, and smart. Check it out.

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And now, back to our regularly scheduled programming: Before dinner the other night, Harper made a person out of spaghetti noodles.

 

 




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